When Seizures Happen

The information on this page is not intended to substitute for medical advice. It is created as an example of what we do when we are around someone who is experiencing a seizure.

Seizures can be scary to the observer, especially if you have never seen one. It is important to remember to stay calm, seizures VERY RARELY are life threatening. In most cases of injury and death in someone with Epilepsy, it is the not the seizure itself that poses the danger but the objects around the person and their location. Be aware of your surroundings and DO NOT LEAVE THE PERSON ALONE!

For a Non-Convulsive Seizure
(characterized by non-purposeful movements, staring blankly with no response, confusion)

1. Stay with the person.
Do not attempt to stop the seizure. If possible, time the length of the seizure.

2. Remove anything dangerous from the immediate area.
Including any objects that might hinder the person's breathing.

3. Do NOT restrain the person.

4. If possible and necessary, guide the person to a safe area, away from any potential hazards.

5. Once the seizure is over, talk reassuringly to the person.
Stay with the person until they are lucid and can communicate that the seizure is over and they are not in need of any further medical attention.

For a Convulsive Seizure
(Characterized by jerking movements, falling, stiffening, multiple repetitive motions)

1. Stay with the Person and be calm.
The seizure should run its course within a few minutes

2. Try to time the seizure. Time can seem to go on and on, be sure to NOT estimate the duration, should medical intervention be required, the amount of time the person has been in seizure can be critical to their treatment.

3. Move all potentially harmful objects from around or near the person.
If possible, place something soft under the head and check for medical identification.

4. Loosen any tight clothing from around the neck.

5. Do NOT restrain the person.

6. Do NOT put anything in the mouth. The person WILL NOT swallow their tongue.

7. When the seizure begins to subside, place the person on his or her side. This will ensure that the person will not choke on their own saliva or any other fluids that may be in the mouth or obstructing the airway.

8. Once the seizure has subsided, reassure the person.
Stay with the person until they are lucid and can communicate that the seizure is over and they are not in need of any further medical attention.

WHEN TO CALL FOR HELP

Call for help anytime you are concerned about the person's ability to breathe, if an injury has been sustained or if the seizure is longer than 4 minutes.

For more information on Seizure First Aid please visit:
http://epilepsyfoundation.org/about/firstaid/index.cfm

The information on this page is not intended to substitute for medical advice. It is created as an example of what we do when we are around someone who is experiencing a seizure.

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What a Seizure looks like (Graphic Content Included)

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Seizure Tracker.com

Seizure Tracker.com
Free online tools to provide people living with epilepsy and their doctors with a better understanding of the relationship between seizure activity and anti-epileptic medication dosages. Reports generated on SeizureTracker.com include detail graphing capabilities and are easily sharable with caregivers.

Diamond Potential Awareness Award

Diamond Potential Awareness Award
Thank you Holly at Diamond Potential for this award. Awareness leads to understanding and acceptance. And let's face it, we all need to feel accepted for who we are. The battle has just begun!

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