One stupid thing

>> Sunday, August 5, 2012

And I can't shake the sadness. One seizure today. But it was a wild one.

We were just leaving the Evanston Train Show for our two hour ride home. Glenn, Bug and Uncle Scot where already in the car when I started walking toward them. Tay was running at me.

What's up?

"Bug is having a bad seizure."

I hurried as much as I could with a 20+ pound wiggling Ava strapped to me and by the time I got there, all that was left was the description and a VERY out of it little man. He was not back and he was wet. Uh oh. But, relax, it was water. Whew.

Glenn told me it was a Tonic/Clonic. A bad one. Not sure of the time. Which meant he didn't want to think about it because he ALWAYS knows how long they are. Must have been bad. Bug came around, a little, about 10 minutes later. I climbed in the car, holding him while he tried to shake it off and sleep. It took him another 5 minutes to get to the point I could give him his medicine since it was time. He took it, not easily and drifted to sleep.

For 10 minutes. And then he was back, although tired. Well, no kidding, the lactic acid buildup from that much muscle strain has GOT to be epic. Still, he ate well, more than I did actually, and we left.

He made it the rest of the day with no more, but it shook me. These highs and lows are destructive. They take so much effort to level out, to find a happy medium. To accept that it happened and it sucked, but that there was nothing to be done and one must move forward.

Uh, huh. Like that's gonna happen.

But, I will try. Tomorrow. Always tomorrow, because today, as fun as it was...sucked.

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What a Seizure looks like (Graphic Content Included)

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Seizure Tracker.com

Seizure Tracker.com
Free online tools to provide people living with epilepsy and their doctors with a better understanding of the relationship between seizure activity and anti-epileptic medication dosages. Reports generated on SeizureTracker.com include detail graphing capabilities and are easily sharable with caregivers.

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Diamond Potential Awareness Award
Thank you Holly at Diamond Potential for this award. Awareness leads to understanding and acceptance. And let's face it, we all need to feel accepted for who we are. The battle has just begun!

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